Tuesday, April 04, 2006

not just a dash......

Several weeks ago, a headstone was placed at my mothers grave.
It's very pretty... Soft grey with angels engraved at each upper corner..
Of course her name is engraved, along with the date of her birth, and that of her death.

As I looked at this memorial I thought of something I once read. How interesting it is that a person's entire life is summed up by a dash between two numbers.

It represents the joy her parents felt when their firstborn child entered the world, and the sorrow my mother felt when she was just a young child and her parents died. Her happiness when she became a mother, a grandmother, and then a great-grandmother...

In just that small dash, are years of memories, happiness, sorrow, joy, tears.... Lives changed by her words, her touch....

The image in my mind when I see that tiny dash is much more than any photograph could ever show....

9 Comments:

Anonymous Last Girl On Earth said...

I read this post, and I feel for you. My mother is very sick right now, and I guess it hit me pretty close to home right now. I will come back and read more. Michele sent me tonight, and I'm glad she did. Thank you for your words. They are beautiful.

10:42 PM, April 06, 2006  
Blogger Paige said...

Wow, what an insight! I will not read markers in the same way again. thanks
Hi here via Michele's

6:23 AM, April 07, 2006  
Anonymous Meg said...

Hi!

This post means so much to me, as only this week, we lost my dear Aunt. Yes, life is more than a "dash" but we'll never know how long (or short) it is destined to be.

Thanks for your words.

7:25 AM, April 08, 2006  
Anonymous archshrk said...

Hello, Michele sent me.
I've heard this concept before and it makes me wonder, how would you try to convey the idea of someone's life with more than a dash? You can't carve the story of their life on the stone but maybe a symbol or image or a short phrase...

1:26 PM, April 13, 2006  
Blogger Dawn Falcone said...

Thank you for sharing your story with us. Ovarian cancer is present in my life also. My grandmother was diagnoised with it 10 years ago & survived. It came back about 2 years ago & again she survived. We recently found out that it is back again & this time they can not operate. I'm feeling so many different emotions right now about it all. The worst part is not knowing just how much time we have left with her. By the way, I'm here via Michele.

1:08 AM, April 14, 2006  
Blogger Robin said...

Truly an eye-opening insight...I never thought of it that way, but it is unmistakeably true. Thanks for sharing this.

I'm here from Michele's...

3:44 AM, April 14, 2006  
Blogger Ravvy said...

thankyou so much for the courage to share your mothers battle with us all...

the question i want to ask is...

how are you?

here via micheles today

praying for you xox

4:05 AM, April 14, 2006  
Blogger Crayonsetc said...

Wow... I never thought about it that way.

Stopping by via Michele!

2:23 PM, April 22, 2006  
Blogger Carmi said...

I find myself exploring your older entries, absorbing your wisdom about life, loss and healing.

When I was younger, I would often walk through the graveyard in my neighborhood. Every stone had a story of a life, and I would always try to project in my imagination what that stone was telling me about that person.

It led me to eventually hunt down my relative's graves and ultimately learn more about myself and where I came from.

Your words are powerful testament to our need to make a difference with whatever time we've got.

9:09 PM, September 03, 2006  

Post a Comment

<< Home

(written September of 2005) I have learned much in the last nine months. I have read that ovarian cancer whispers. I say it screams. It just needs someone to listen. The American Cancer Society statistics for ovarian cancer estimate that there will be 22,220 new cases and 16,210 deaths in 2005. This is a death rate FOUR TIMES that of breast cancer.Almost 70 percent of women with the common epithelial ovarian cancer are not diagnosed until the disease is advanced in stage. The 5-year survival rate for these women is only 15 to 20 percent. This is unacceptable. Women need to be made more aware of the symptoms, and doctors need to listen to their patients. Especially when the patient tells them that they fear they have ovca, as my mother did for almost a year before she was finally diagnosed. It’s so sad and senseless when a woman knows the symptoms but can’t get anyone to listen to what she is saying.

©JsDaughter